Denmark 1819 speciedaler Dav-72

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Heritage sale 3010, lot 20811
photo courtesy Heritage Auction Galleries

This specimen was lot 20811 in Heritage sale 3010 (Boston, August 2010), where it sold for $1,840. The catalog description[1] noted, "Frederick VI Speciedaler 1819-FF, F-VF, some tiny flan flaws present. The last Danish coin containing the Norwegian lion in the coat of arms. Denmark lost its Norwegian territory to Sweden in 1814, and by rights should not have left Norway in its coat of arms. Sweden protested this coin's design, and it was recalled. This is easily the rarest Danish crown of the 19th century." Danish currency endured several "reforms" in the nineteenth century. Until 1813, 1 ducat = 2 speciedaler = 12 mark = 192 skilling Danske. After the reform of 1813, 1 frederiks d'or = 5 speciedaler = 10 rigsbankdaler = 960 rigsbankskilling. In 1854, the speciedaler was dropped but the remaining denominations were unchanged. In 1874, all the old denominations were terminated in favor of 1 krone = 100 ore, which system is still in use, tho the krone is no longer silver. King Frederik VI ruled 1808-39.

Recorded mintage: unknown.

Specification: 28.89 g, .875 fine silver, .812 troy oz ASW.

Catalog reference: Davenport-72, KM 693.

Source:

  • Cuhaj, George S., and Thomas Michael, Standard Catalog of World Coins, 1801-1900, 7th ed., Iola, WI: Krause Publications, 2012.
  • Siegs Møntcatalog 2016: Danmark med Omrader, 48 ed., Frederikssund, Siegs Forlag ApS, 2015.
  • [1]Tucker, Warren, Scott Cordry and John Kraljevich, Heritage Sale 3010: World Coins, Dallas, TX: Heritage Auction Galleries, 2010.

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