Currency of the Banco Minero de Chihuahua

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M128a, from the San Dimas Collection
Mexico 1888 25 centavos M128a rev JS.jpg

The Banco Minero succeeded the Banco Minero Chihuahuense in 1888 and survived until the revocation of its charter in 1915. It also absorbed the Banco de Chihuahua in 1890 and the Banco Comercial de Chihuahua in 1900. It was a puppet of the Terrazas-Creel faction.

1888 25 centavos

This note, printed by the American Bank Note Co., is the only issue of this denomination by this bank, It is rather scarce as an issued note.

Catalog reference: Frampton M128a, 118 x 55 mm.

1914 peso

M130d, from the San Dimas Collection
Mexico 1914 peso M130d rev JS.jpg

This note, printed by the American Bank Note Co., was originally issued in 1888 and 1895 prior to the government's ban on notes below five pesos. In 1914, this ban was rescinded, the old plates dusted off and large quantities issued. This is the most common note of this bank.

Catalog reference: Frampton M130d, 156 x 69 mm.

1910 5 pesos

M132a, from the San Dimas Collection
Mexico 1910 5 pesos M132a rev JS.jpg

This note, printed by the American Bank Note Co., is the first commemorative currency issued in Mexico and perhaps the world. It, and the accompanying ten pesos (M134), is among the most popular bank notes of Mexico. While it is not rare, nice specimens are very scarce and hotly pursued.

Catalog reference: Frampton M132a, 169 x 72 mm.

1914 5 pesos

M131h, from the San Dimas Collection
Mexico 1914 5 pesos M131h rev JS.jpg

This note, printed by the American Bank Note Co., is the regular issue version of the commemorative (M132) shown above. Part of the massive inflationary issue of 1913-14, it is the most common five pesos of this bank.

Catalog reference: Frampton M131h, 167 x 72 mm.

1910 10 pesos

M134a, from the San Dimas Collection
Mexico 1910 10 pesos M134a rev JS.jpg
M155a, from the San Dimas Collection
Mexico 1914 10 pesos M155a rev JS.jpg

This note, printed by the American Bank Note Co., is the first commemorative currency issued in Mexico and perhaps the world. It, and the accompanying five pesos (M132), is among the most popular bank notes of Mexico. While it is not rare, nice specimens are very scarce and hotly pursued. The second note was locally printed in large quantities.

Catalog reference: Frampton M134a, 184 x 82 mm.

1912 10 pesos

M133e, Chihuahua overprint, from the San Dimas Collection
Mexico 1912 10 pesos M133e rev JS.jpg

This note, printed by the American Bank Note Co., is the regular issue of the commemorative (M134) shown above. The Chihuahua overprint raises the value slightly as the overprint was not included in the massive issue of 1913-14.

Catalog reference: Frampton M133e, 184 x 82 mm.

1911 20 pesos

M135d, from the San Dimas Collection
Mexico 1911 20 pesos M135d rev JS.jpg

This specimen, with its Chihuahua overprint, is a fairly common representative of this denomination. Only M135c below, from the issue of 1913-14, is more common.

Recorded issue: unknown.

Catalog reference: Frampton M135d.

1914 20 pesos

M135c, Heritage sale 39062, lot 32072
image courtesy Heritage Auction Galleries

This specimen was sold in a Heritage internet sale (Dallas, June 2009) for $195.50. The catalog description noted, "Mexico Banco Minero 20 Pesos 1914. This attractive note with an orange and yellow underprint features several detailed vignettes. The central image includes a public water well with many people gathered around. Very Fine+." Frampton, et al., note various issues of this note dated 1888-1914 along with an overprint from Gomez Palacio (M135e).

Recorded issue: unknown.

Catalog reference: Pick S165Be, Frampton M135c.

fifty pesos

1910 50 pesos, M136e
from the San Dimas Collection

Catalog reference: Frampton M136e.

1901 100 pesos

M137c, from the San Dimas Collection
Mexico 1901 100 pesos M137c rev JS.jpg

One hundred peso notes are scarce to rare from the Banco period. This one turns up occasionally but is expensive. Several overprints exist, none common. Large denomination notes became common during the Revolution, when currency was backed by guns, not bullion.

Recorded issue: unknown.

Catalog reference: Frampton M137c, 184 x 82 mm.

Source:

  • Frampton, Cory, Duane Douglas, Alberto Hidalgo and Elmer Powell, Mexican Paper Money, 2010 Edition, Carefree, AZ: Mexican Coin Co., 2010.

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