Difference between revisions of "Russia 1757-SP YI ruble Dav-1680"

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[[Image:Russia 1757 ruble rev Heritage 3021-22529.jpg|300px|thumb]]
 
[[Image:Russia 1757 ruble rev Heritage 3021-22529.jpg|300px|thumb]]
  
This specimen was lot 22529 in Heritage sale 3021 (New York, January 2013), where it sold for $79,312.50. The catalog description<sup>[1]</sup> noted, "Seldom Offered 1757 Dassier Rouble. Elizabeth I Dassier Rouble 1757 ЯI, Crowned bust of Elizabeth right / Double-headed Imperial eagle with date above, AU Details, Obverse Repaired, NGC. The strike is a bit soft in Elizabeth's hair, as always seen with this issue. Close examination appears to show evidence of past attempt to smooth a small flan flaw on the shoulder of the bust, but without magnification, one barely notices this indiscretion. An extremely rare, and popular, type." The coinage of Russia of the eighteenth century is a confusing and fascinating subject. Many ruble types were issued only briefly and can be dated even if they don't bear dates. This type seems fairly common as these things go but still elusive and expensive. The rubles of Peter II were about 28 grams but shrank to 20 grams by the end of the reign of Catherine the Great. This type seems to be the rarest of the rubles dated 1757; there are also silver rubles from St. Peterburg and Moscow (Dav-1679, Dav-1681) and a gold ruble.
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This specimen was lot 22529 in Heritage sale 3021 (New York, January 2013), where it sold for $79,312.50. The catalog description<sup>[1]</sup> noted, "Seldom Offered 1757 Dassier Rouble. Elizabeth I Dassier Rouble 1757 ЯI, Crowned bust of Elizabeth right / Double-headed Imperial eagle with date above, AU Details, Obverse Repaired, NGC. The strike is a bit soft in Elizabeth's hair, as always seen with this issue. Close examination appears to show evidence of past attempt to smooth a small flan flaw on the shoulder of the bust, but without magnification, one barely notices this indiscretion. An extremely rare, and popular, type." The coinage of Russia of the eighteenth century is a confusing and fascinating subject. Many ruble types were issued only briefly and can be dated even if they don't bear dates. This type seems fairly common as these things go but still elusive and expensive. The rubles of Peter II were about 28 grams but shrank to 20 grams by the end of the reign of Catherine the Great. This type seems to be the rarest of the rubles dated 1757; there are also silver rubles from St. Peterburg and Moscow ([[Russia 1757-SP IM ruble Dav-1679|Dav-1679]], Dav-1681) and a gold ruble.
  
 
''Recorded mintage:'' 536,000 (including Dav-1679).
 
''Recorded mintage:'' 536,000 (including Dav-1679).
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* [[Russia 1757 kopek]]
 
* [[Russia 1757 kopek]]
 
* [[Russia 1757 2 kopeks KM-C8]]
 
* [[Russia 1757 2 kopeks KM-C8]]
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* [[Russia 1757-SP IM ruble Dav-1679|1757-ϹПБ ruble, regular issue]]
 
* [[Russia 1757-SP 10 rubles Fr-122]]
 
* [[Russia 1757-SP 10 rubles Fr-122]]
* [[Russia 1758-SP YI ruble Dav-1681|1758-SP ruble]]
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* [[Russia 1758-SP YI ruble Dav-1681|1758-ϹПБ ruble]]
 
* [[Coins and currency dated 1757]]
 
* [[Coins and currency dated 1757]]
 
* return to coins of [[Russia]]
 
* return to coins of [[Russia]]
  
 
[[Category: European crowns and thalers]][[Category:Selections from Heritage sale 3021]]
 
[[Category: European crowns and thalers]][[Category:Selections from Heritage sale 3021]]

Latest revision as of 17:45, 24 June 2019

Heritage sale 3021, lot 22529
Russia 1757 ruble rev Heritage 3021-22529.jpg

This specimen was lot 22529 in Heritage sale 3021 (New York, January 2013), where it sold for $79,312.50. The catalog description[1] noted, "Seldom Offered 1757 Dassier Rouble. Elizabeth I Dassier Rouble 1757 ЯI, Crowned bust of Elizabeth right / Double-headed Imperial eagle with date above, AU Details, Obverse Repaired, NGC. The strike is a bit soft in Elizabeth's hair, as always seen with this issue. Close examination appears to show evidence of past attempt to smooth a small flan flaw on the shoulder of the bust, but without magnification, one barely notices this indiscretion. An extremely rare, and popular, type." The coinage of Russia of the eighteenth century is a confusing and fascinating subject. Many ruble types were issued only briefly and can be dated even if they don't bear dates. This type seems fairly common as these things go but still elusive and expensive. The rubles of Peter II were about 28 grams but shrank to 20 grams by the end of the reign of Catherine the Great. This type seems to be the rarest of the rubles dated 1757; there are also silver rubles from St. Peterburg and Moscow (Dav-1679, Dav-1681) and a gold ruble.

Recorded mintage: 536,000 (including Dav-1679).

Specification: 25.85 g, .802 fine silver, .666 troy oz ASW.

Catalog reference: Bitkin 282, Dav-1680, KM C19c.3.

Source:

  • Michael, Thomas, Standard Catalog of World Coins, 1701-1800, 7th ed., Iola, WI: Krause Publications, 2016.
  • Davenport, John S., European Crowns, 1700-1800, 2nd Ed., London: Spink & Son, 1964.
  • Bitkin, Vladimir, Composite Catalogue of Russian Coins, Part II (1740-1917), Kiev: Moneta, 2003.
  • Harris, Robert P., Guidebook of Russian Coins, 1725 to 1970, Santa Cruz, CA: Bonanza Press, 1971.
  • [1]Bierrenbach, Cristiano, Warren Tucker and David Michaels, Heritage World and Ancient Coins Auction 3021, featuring the Cecil Webster, Richard P. Ariagno and Elizabeth McPhall Charters Collection, Dallas: Heritage Auction Galleries, 2012.

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