Difference between revisions of "Mexico 1800-Mo 1/4 real"

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[[Image:Mexico Sedwick 25-1201.jpg|550px|thumb|Sedwick sale 25, lot 1201]]
 
[[Image:Mexico Sedwick 25-1201.jpg|550px|thumb|Sedwick sale 25, lot 1201]]
  
This specimen was lot 1201 in Sedwick sale 25 (Winter Park, FL, May 2018), where it sold for $892.50. The catalog description<sup>[1]</sup> noted, "Mexico City, [[Mexico]], 1/4 real, 1800, NGC MS 64, finest known in NGC census. Super strike and satin-smooth fields with ample luster, rainbow toning (mostly purple). NGC #4715670-004." This specimen, the smallest silver coin struck in colonial times, is an example of a type struck 1796-1816 thru the reigns of Charles IV and Ferdinand VII. The type is not rare tho slightly scarcer than contemporary half or one reales. Harris<sup>[2]</sup> notes the following mints, in order of abundance: Santiago (commonest), Mexico, Lima, Guatemala, Potosi, Nuevo Reino and Popayán (rarest). The Republic of Mexico struck a silver quarter real 1842-63. It is not recorded if this coin circulated in the United States, but if so, it would have had a face value of 3-1/8 cents.  
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This specimen was lot 1201 in Sedwick sale 25 (Winter Park, FL, May 2019), where it sold for $892.50. The catalog description<sup>[1]</sup> noted, "Mexico City, [[Mexico]], 1/4 real, 1800, NGC MS 64, finest known in NGC census. Super strike and satin-smooth fields with ample luster, rainbow toning (mostly purple). NGC #4715670-004." This specimen, the smallest silver coin struck in colonial times, is an example of a type struck 1796-1816 thru the reigns of Charles IV and Ferdinand VII. The type is not rare tho slightly scarcer than contemporary half or one reales. Harris<sup>[2]</sup> notes the following mints, in order of abundance: Santiago (commonest), Mexico, Lima, Guatemala, Potosi, Nuevo Reino and Popayán (rarest). The Republic of Mexico struck a silver quarter real 1842-63. It is not recorded if this coin circulated in the United States, but if so, it would have had a face value of 3-1/8 cents.  
  
 
''Recorded mintage:'' unknown.
 
''Recorded mintage:'' unknown.
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''[[Bibliography|Source:]]''
 
''[[Bibliography|Source:]]''
* Cuhaj, George S., and Thomas Michael, ''Standard Catalog of World Coins, 1801-1900, 7th ed.,'' Iola, WI: Krause Publications, 2012.
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* Michael, Thomas, ''Standard Catalog of World Coins, 1701-1800, 7th ed.,'' Iola, WI: Krause Publications, 2016.
 
* Cayón, Adolfo, Clemente Cayón and Juan Cayón, ''Las Monedas Españolas, del Tremis al Euro: del 411 a Nuestros Dias, 2 volumes,'' Madrid: Cayón9-Jano S.L., 2005.
 
* Cayón, Adolfo, Clemente Cayón and Juan Cayón, ''Las Monedas Españolas, del Tremis al Euro: del 411 a Nuestros Dias, 2 volumes,'' Madrid: Cayón9-Jano S.L., 2005.
 
* Calicó, Xavier, ''Numismática Española: Catálogo General con Precios de Todas las Monedas Españolas Acuñadas desde Los Reyes Católicos Hasta Juan Carlos I, 1474 a 2001,'' Barcelona: Aureo & Calicó, 2008.
 
* Calicó, Xavier, ''Numismática Española: Catálogo General con Precios de Todas las Monedas Españolas Acuñadas desde Los Reyes Católicos Hasta Juan Carlos I, 1474 a 2001,'' Barcelona: Aureo & Calicó, 2008.

Latest revision as of 18:02, 2 June 2019

Sedwick sale 25, lot 1201

This specimen was lot 1201 in Sedwick sale 25 (Winter Park, FL, May 2019), where it sold for $892.50. The catalog description[1] noted, "Mexico City, Mexico, 1/4 real, 1800, NGC MS 64, finest known in NGC census. Super strike and satin-smooth fields with ample luster, rainbow toning (mostly purple). NGC #4715670-004." This specimen, the smallest silver coin struck in colonial times, is an example of a type struck 1796-1816 thru the reigns of Charles IV and Ferdinand VII. The type is not rare tho slightly scarcer than contemporary half or one reales. Harris[2] notes the following mints, in order of abundance: Santiago (commonest), Mexico, Lima, Guatemala, Potosi, Nuevo Reino and Popayán (rarest). The Republic of Mexico struck a silver quarter real 1842-63. It is not recorded if this coin circulated in the United States, but if so, it would have had a face value of 3-1/8 cents.

Recorded mintage: unknown.

Specification: 0.84 g, .896 fine silver.

Catalog reference: KM-62; CT-1400.

Source:

  • Michael, Thomas, Standard Catalog of World Coins, 1701-1800, 7th ed., Iola, WI: Krause Publications, 2016.
  • Cayón, Adolfo, Clemente Cayón and Juan Cayón, Las Monedas Españolas, del Tremis al Euro: del 411 a Nuestros Dias, 2 volumes, Madrid: Cayón9-Jano S.L., 2005.
  • Calicó, Xavier, Numismática Española: Catálogo General con Precios de Todas las Monedas Españolas Acuñadas desde Los Reyes Católicos Hasta Juan Carlos I, 1474 a 2001, Barcelona: Aureo & Calicó, 2008.
  • [2]Harris, Robert P., Pillars & Portraits, San José, CA: Bonanza Press, 1968.
  • [1]Sedwick, Daniel Frank, Augi Garcia and Cori Sedwick Downing, Treasure Auction 25, Winter Park, FL: Daniel Frank Sedwick LLC, 2019.

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