Difference between revisions of "Great Britain (1623-24) 1/4 laurel Fr-244"

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* [[Great Britain (1620-21) 1/4 laurel Fr-244|(1620-21) quarter laurel]]
 
* [[Great Britain (1623-24) shilling]]
 
* [[Great Britain (1623-24) shilling]]
 
* [[Great Britain (1623-24) 1/2 laurel Fr-243]]
 
* [[Great Britain (1623-24) 1/2 laurel Fr-243]]

Latest revision as of 15:44, 13 August 2019

Heritage sale 3038, lot 34714
Great Britain H3038-34714r.jpg

This specimen was lot 34714 in Heritage sale 3038 (Dallas, January 2015), where it sold for $1,586.25. The catalog description[1] noted, "James I (1603-25) gold 1/4 Laurel ND (1623-24) MS62 PCGS, 3rd Coinage of 1619-25, Lis mm. A bright and lustrous example with typical ragged edges. The bust and reverse arms are quite sharp, as are the portions of the legend that are fully on-flan." James I, who united England and Scotland, invented the term Great Britain. The laurel coinage of the second half of his reign comes in one (Fr-242), half (Fr-243) and quarter laurel, all expensive.

Recorded mintage: unknown.

Specification: 2.25 g, .917 fine gold.

Catalog reference: KM 69, Fr-244, S-2642B, North-2119.

Source:

  • Cuhaj, George S., and Thomas Michael, Standard Catalog of World Coins, 1601-1700, 6th ed., Iola, WI: Krause Publications, 2014.
  • Friedberg, Arthur L. and Ira S. Friedberg, Gold Coins of the World, From Ancient Times to the Present, 7th ed., Clifton, NJ: Coin and Currency Institute, 2003.
  • [1]Bierrenbach, Cristiano, Warren Tucker and Scott Cordry, Heritage Signature Auction 3037, featuring the Empire, the Santa Catarina, the Law and the Santa Maria Collections, Dallas, TX: Heritage Auction Galleries, 2014.
  • Lobel, Richard, Mark Davidson, Allan Hailstone and Eleni Calligas, Coincraft's Standard Catalogue of English and UK Coins, 1066 to Date, London: Coincraft, 1995.
  • Skingley, Philip, ed., Standard Catalogue of British Coins: Coins of England & the United Kingdom, 46th edition, London: Spink & Son, 2011.

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